GridMET Drought

Overview
Extent
    Continental United States
Spatial Resolution
    4km
Data Source(s)
    ClimatologyLab.org
Science Partner

Description

GridMET Drought is composed of multiple drought indices and time periods using gridMET climatological data (Abatzoglou, 2013). These are useful indices to quantify the severity of drought for both short and long term time scales. Also available are short and long term drought blends which combine multiple drought indices to produce a more comprehensive index.

 

Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI): A ~9 month timescale drought index based on precipitation and ASCE grass reference evapotranspiration (ETo) (Palmer 1965)

Palmer Z-index: A ~month timescale drought index based on precipitation and ASCE grass reference evapotranspiration (ETo)

Standard Precipitation Index (SPI): A multi-timescale drought drought index based on precipitation (McKee 1993)

Standard Precipitation Evaporation Index (SPEI): A multi-timescale drought index based on precipitation minus ASCE grass reference evapotranspiration (ETo) (Vicente-Serrano 2010)

Evap. Demand Drought Index (EDDI): A multi-timescale drought index based on evaporative demand of the atmosphere (Hobbins et al., 2016; McEvoy et al., 2016)

Short Term Drought Blend: A weighting of the standardized drought indices from gridMET data:

 

Short-term Blend= 0.2 *(PDSI/2) + 0.2 * SPI30d + 0.25 * SPI90d + 0.35 * (Z/2)

Where:

PDSI = Palmer Drought Severity Index

Z = Palmer’s Z-Index

SPI30d = 30-day Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

SPI90d = 90-day Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

 

Long Term Drought Blend: A weighting of the standardized drought indices from gridMET data:

Long-term Blend= 0.35 *(PDSI/2) + 0.15 * SPI180d + 0.2 * SPI1y + 0.2 *SPI2y + 0.1 * SPI5y

Where:

PDSI = Palmer Drought Severity Index

SPI180d = 180-day Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

SPI1y = 1-year Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

SPI2y = 2-year Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

SPI5y = 5-year Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

Technical Information

Feature
Detail
Extent
Continental United States
Period of Record
1979-present
Spatial Resolution
4km
Temporal Resolution
Variable (14 day-5 year)
Data Summaries
trend and statistical significance, spatial aggregations, time series
Data Source(s)
ClimatologyLab.org
Data Formats
raster (geotiff), raster tile (tile ID), time series (.csv, .xls, .json, .geojson)
Sources

Abatzoglou, J. T. (2013). Development of gridded surface meteorological data for ecological applications and modelling. International Journal of Climatology, 33(1), 121-131.

Hobbins, M. T., Wood, A., McEvoy, D. J., Huntington, J. L., Morton, C., Anderson, M., & Hain, C. (2016). The evaporative demand drought index. Part I: Linking drought evolution to variations in evaporative demand. Journal of Hydrometeorology, 17(6), 1745-1761.

McEvoy, D.J., J.L. Huntington, M. Hobbins, A. Wood, and C. Morton, James Verdin, Martha Anderson, and Christopher Hain, 2016: The Evaporative Demand Drought Index: Part II – CONUS-wide Assessment Against Common Drought Indicators. Journal of Hydrometeorology. 17, 1763-1779, doi: 10.1175/JHM-D-15-0122.1.

McKee, T. B., N. J. Doesken, and J. Kliest, 1993: The relationship of drought frequency and duration to time scales. In Proceedings of the 8th Conference of Applied Climatology, 17-22 January, Anaheim, CA. American Meteorological Society, Boston, MA. 179-184.

Palmer, W. C. (1965). Meteorological drought (Vol. 30). US Department of Commerce, Weather Bureau.

Vicente-Serrano S.M., Santiago Beguería, Juan I. López-Moreno, (2010) A Multi-scalar drought index sensitive to global warming: The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index – SPEI. Journal of Climate 23: 1696-1718.

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